Three Questions 9/20/13

1.  Recently I have finished the glog on the history of the Atom.  My Scientist was Ernest Rutherford.

2. I have learned how to name chemical compounds,  I have also learned about cations and anions.

3. I plan on finishing HW#5 after this.

Smaller than an atom….

Let’s get right into it today.

What do we know about what is smaller than the atom?

1. The strong force is worthy of its title.

It takes a million times more force to remove a particle from the nucleus than it does to remove an electron from orbit.  The immense power of the strong force helps to explain the outrageous energy released by nuclear fission.  This is the science behind nuclear weapons, which are capable of obliterating 99.9% of the human race.  What a great world we live in.

But at least we have nuclear power, so it’s not all bad.  Right?…

Moving on.

2.  Electromagnetism is a shocking force.

Excuse the bad pun.  Electromagnetism draws electrons and protons, with their opposite charges, together.  It also pushes protons in the nucleus apart, but the strong force overwhelms it.  Heat and light can strip electrons away from the atom, forming an ion.

3.  There’s always something smaller.

That last sentence was a bit of an overstatement, but you got the point.  Evidence of protons and neutrons was revealed by Einstein’s studies of Brownian motion.  Protons and neutrons are composed of quarks, which are also held together by the strong force.  At this point, new particles can be formed when subjected to intense heat.  This is also the point when you begin to wonder what relevance this has to your daily life and Monday Night Football.  Alas, people thought the same thing about protons and neutrons, until we harnessed that knowledge to create the most powerful weapon of all time.

So next time you think about subatomic particles, think not of what those particles are doing right now, but rather, what those particles will be doing if they get into the wrong hands.

atomic-nuclear-exp_1002958c

Hope you sleep well tonight.

Sources: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrUBPO6zZ40&list=FLD_qtoYY3ZEhrDetUPfjJog; http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=how-are-elements-broken-d

3 Questions 9/18/13

1.  I have finished my math homework and completed the post-lab questions for the labs we did on Friday.

2.  I have learned that logarithms have an actual purpose. They are not just there to confuse high school students.

3. I plan on practicing the all-state etude for saxophone after this.

By aandre15

Old and New Materials

There are many similarities between the materials used by Fio Omenetto in the TED video and the materials used by the Japanese samurai.  To begin, both methods originated in Asia.  Silk making was originally a Chinese secret.  Samurai swords are obviously from Japan.

Despite the drastic difference in the final results,  he methods used to obtain the results are remarkably similar.  In order to forge a sword, the Japanese had to be aware of the physical properties of the metals used.  Some physical properties would be hardness and toughness.  If the sword was too hard, it would break easily.  If it was too tough, then it would bend, rendering it useless in battle.  The Japanese used a combination of the two properties to create a dynamic, durable sword.  Knowledge of melting points was crucial in tempering the blade.

Fio Omenetto’s team had to be aware of the properties of the material they were using.  Silk is biodegradable, bio compatible, and edible, making it a versatile and unique material.  With modern knowledge of chemistry as well as modern technology, Omenetto’s team has been able to create products varying from cups and holograms, to nuts and bolts.

A difference between the two methods is that the Japanese had a set goal in mind, which was a sword.  Omenetto’s team didn’t aim to produce a cup from silk.  Rather, they wanted to explore the possibilities that silk had to offer.  However, knowledge of chemistry, basic and complex, was necessary for both groups to achieve their goal.  Regardless of the passage of time, chemistry will remain a vital tool in the mankind’s endeavor to create, innovate, and manipulate his surroundings.  It’s old, new, and ageless at the same time.

By aandre15